WILS N7340 .S92 1999 p.20
WILS N7340 .S92 1999 p.20, 2018
44 x 42 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.XXX
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.XXX, 2018
44 x 68 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.XI
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.XI, 2018
44 x 45 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS DS715 .S42 1956a p.642
WILS EAS DS715 .S42 1956a p.642, 2018
44 x 59 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.IV
WILS EAS DS715 .H74 1985 p.IV, 2019
44 x 44 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS DS715 .S42 1956a p.642
WILS EAS DS715 .Z435 2004 p.130, 2019
44 x 63 inches, Archival inkjet print
WILS EAS CC115 .U45 A34 1973 p.19
WILS EAS CC115 .U45 A34 1973 p.19, 2019
44 x 36 inches, Archival inkjet print

Installation view

In the archeological context, in situ refers to the state of artifacts in which they have not been moved from their original place of deposition. Archeologists often take photographs during excavations to document this locational information. Being in situ is critical for the interpretation of artifacts and the culture they belong to.
In the eponymous project, I excavate photographs that carry the in situ information from archives that are remote and foreign to these artifacts’ original culture. These photographs are printed and reprinted uncountable times, sailing across the ocean to the hands of the appropriator. Variation in time and space have distorted their visual information. By enlarging them to a visceral size, I invite audiences to travel back in time through these portals and see the artifacts upon their exposure to the contemporary. Squeezing myself through these dense halftones of time, I propose a possibility to see these artifacts in their original context with dirt and thick air. Furthermore, a possibility to question the national narratives and institutional interpretations of these discoveries that are under the guise of pristine museum display.
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